How to Update CPU Microcode in Award or Phoenix BIOS – For LGA 771 & 775

MODs

150 Comments

In this guide, we're going to show you how to update the CPU microcode in an Award or Phoenix BIOS. If you have an AMI BIOS, check out this guide instead.

Note: This information has only been tested with LGA 771 and LGA 775 BIOS files, so if you have a newer motherboard (especially UEFI ones), it probably won't work.

Why would you want to do this?

Updating the microcode is helpful if:

  • You did the LGA 771 to 775 MOD, and your Xeon is not working as expected (or is missing functionality, such as CompareExchange128, Speedstep, SSE 4.1, or VT-X).
  • Your BIOS doesn't support a newer processor that you want to run.
  • The microcode for your processor is old and may be buggy.

Disclaimer

There's an element of risk just flashing a normal BIOS, and especially when you start modifying it, so please attempt this mod at your own risk (and only if you're experiencing some problem). We highly recommend that you don't flash the modified BIOS unless you've verified the microcode was added correctly. If you accidentally remove the microcode that your processor needs, your system may fail to boot. We are not responsible if your system is damaged while attempting this.

Things you'll need

  • The latest BIOS for your motherboard
  • cbrom195.exe - Updates microcode for Award and Phoenix BIOSes

Method 1 (recommended) - Replace all of your existing microcode with the latest microcode from Intel

This method will delete all of your old microcode and replace it with the latest microcode from Intel.

Other programs you'll need

Step 1 - Download the file that contains the microcode for all the processors you want your motherboard to support

The following microcode is only compatible with method 1 of this guide (it's in a combined NCPUCODE.BIN format instead of individual microcode files). This makes it easier to update all of your microcodes at once.

  • Desktop LGA 771 and LGA 775 microcode (76 KB)
    • Use this if you want to run LGA 771 Xeons in an LGA 775 motherboard
    • Supports all Core 2 Duo and later LGA 775 desktop processors (no Pentium 4 or mobile support)
    • Supports all LGA 771 Xeon processors (except older Pentium 4 based 50xx models)
  • Desktop LGA 775 microcode (44 KB)
    • Supports all Core 2 Duo and later desktop processors (no Pentium 4 or mobile support)
  • Mobile LGA 775 microcode (44 KB)
    • Supports all Core 2 Duo and later mobile/laptop processors (no Pentium 4 or desktop support)
  • LGA 771 microcode (32 KB)
    • Supports all the LGA 771 Xeon processors mentioned earlier (no LGA 775 or mobile support)

Alternate microcode (in case the others are too big)

Step 2 - Move all of the files you just downloaded to the same directory (or folder), and open that directory in a DOS command prompt window

How to open a folder in a DOS command prompt window

Step 3 - Rename the microcode file to ncpucode.bin, and make it readonly

You can make it readonly with the following command:

attrib +R ncpucode.bin

This is necessary to stop cbrom from overwriting this file with your old microcode.

Step 4 - Delete the old microcode and replace it with the new code

The following command will delete all of the original microcode and replace it with the new microcode (which is in ncpucode.bin). It will just update YOUR_BIOS.BIN (it won't create a new file).

cbrom195.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN /nc_cpucode NCPUCODE.BIN
  • YOUR_BIOS.BIN is the name of your BIOS file (it doesn't have to end in .BIN)
  • NCPUCODE.BIN is the name of the microcode file downloaded earlier

Having trouble finding the BIOS file that you need to MOD?

Read this

What to do if you get an error about not enough space

First, try one of the smaller, alternate microcode files mentioned earlier. If that doesn't help, you probably have a BIOS that doesn't support the ncpucode.bin method of updating the microcodes, and you'll need to use the 2nd method instead.

Step 5 - Verify that the microcode was added correctly

The following command will show you a list of all of the microcodes in your BIOS file:

intelmicrocodelist.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN

You should verify that the microcode for your processor's CPUID is present. If you don't know what your CPUID is, check out the following guide: How to get the CPUID, Stepping, or sSpec for an Intel CPU.

If the dates of the microcodes are from 2010 (which is when Intel last updated them), you should have the newest microcode.

Step 6 - Update your BIOS using the modified BIOS that you just created

You should be able to update it the same way you'd update a normal BIOS.

Step 7 - Do a FULL BIOS reset (use the 3-pin motherboard reset jumper, and then load the default BIOS settings on the first startup)

How to fully reset your BIOS

Method 2 - Only add support for a new processor that isn't currently supported (old microcode will not be updated or removed)

This method is useful if your BIOS doesn't currently support a processor, and you want to add the microcode to support it. It should also work for adding LGA 771 Xeon support to an LGA 775 BIOS. All of your existing microcode will remain untouched and won't be updated or removed.

Note: This method may not work if you're trying to update the microcode for a processor that's already supported by your BIOS (you should use method 1 instead). This is the case because this method doesn't remove the old microcode, so the old microcode may get used instead of the new microcode you're adding (we're not sure which microcode the BIOS will use).

Step 1 - Download the microcode for the type of processor you want to install

The microcode files shown below are NOT the same as the ones referenced in method 1 above (they're in a different format), so you'll need to download these instead.

  • LGA 771 microcode
    • If you're only trying to add LGA 771 Xeon support to an LGA 775 motherboard, this is the only file you need to download
    • Contains microcode for all LGA 771 Xeon processors (except older Pentium 4 based 50xx models).
  • Desktop LGA 775 microcode
    • Contains microcode for all Core 2 Duo and later desktop processors (no Pentium 4 or mobile support)
  • Mobile LGA 775 microcode
    • Contains microcode for all Core 2 Duo and later mobile/laptop processors (no Pentium 4 or desktop support)

Step 2 - Look up the CPUID for your processor

You'll need the CPUID to update the right microcode (how to get the CPUID for an Intel CPU).

Step 3 - Set aside the microcode files for your processor's CPUID

Note: If your CPUID ends in an "h" and you don't see microcode with an "h" on the end, just ignore the "h" because it isn't actually part part of the CPUID. That just means it's a hexadecimal number.

When you unzip the microcodes, you'll see a bunch of individual microcode files that have filenames like this:

cpu0001067a_plat00000044_ver00000a0b_date20100928.bin

Here's what the different parts of the filename mean:

  • cpu0001067a - 1067A is the CPUID that is supported by this microcode
  • plat00000044 - plat is short for platform. This tells which sockets are supported by the microcode.
    • LGA 771 microcodes have a 4, 40, or 44 in this section
    • Desktop LGA 775 has a 1, 10, or 11
    • And for mobile LGA 775 it's a 20, 80, or A0
  • ver00000a0b - a0b is the version number
  • date20100928 - 2010-09-28 is the date the microcode was last updated

Set aside the microcode files for your processor's CPUID (there may be more than one).

Step 4 - Move cbrom195, your BIOS file, and the microcode files you set aside earlier to the same directory, and open that directory in a DOS command prompt window

How to open a folder in a DOS command prompt window

Step 5 - Rename your CPU's microcode file to cpucode.bin (plus what to do if you have multiple microcode files)

If there are multiple microcode files for your CPU, you'll need to combine them into 1 file with the following command:

copy /b file1.bin + file2.bin + file3.bin cpucode.bin

The example shown above will combine file1.bin, file2.bin, and file3.bin into 1 new file called cpucode.bin.

Step 6 - Add the new microcode to your BIOS

The following command will add the new microcode to your YOUR_BIOS.BIN (it won't touch any of the existing microcode).

cbrom195.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN /cpucode CPUCODE.BIN
  • YOUR_BIOS.BIN is the name of your BIOS file (it doesn't have to end in .BIN)
  • CPUCODE.BIN is the name of the microcode file

Having trouble finding the BIOS file that you need to MOD?

Read this

Step 7 - Verify that the microcode was added correctly

Run the following command to display information about what's stored in your BIOS:

cbrom195.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN /D

You should see a new module called "CPU micro code" at the end of the numbered list, and its filename should be the same as the microcode file you added in step 6 (cpucode.bin).

Why don't I see the new microcode in the "Micro Code Information" table at the bottom of the screen?

This table is supposed to list all of the microcodes in your BIOS. However, since we added the new microcodes as a compressed module, they won't show up in this list. Additionally, since the microcodes are stored in a compressed form, you also won't see them if you run intelmicrocodelist.exe on your BIOS (this program was mentioned in method 1).

The "Micro Code Information" table may also be empty for some BIOSes

This is normal, and you'll usually see this happen when method 1 failed due to not enough free space. It just means the microcodes are stored in a non-standard way in your BIOS. However, the method we just used for updating the microcodes should still work fine.

Step 8 - Update your BIOS using the modified BIOS that you just created

You should be able to update it the same way you'd update a normal BIOS.

Step 9 - Do a FULL BIOS reset (use the 3-pin motherboard reset jumper, and then load the default BIOS settings on the first startup)

How to fully reset your BIOS

Troubleshooting Problems

I can't find the BIOS file that I need to MOD

If your BIOS is in an .EXE format

You'll need to first extract it with an unzipping program like 7-Zip. Then look for a file that ends in .BIN, .ROM, or possibly something else like a number. LGA 775 BIOSes are usually around 1024 KB in size, so look for a file about that size.

You can also try running the following command on each of the files that could be your BIOS:

cbrom195.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN /D

If cbrom displays information about your BIOS after running that command, it should be the correct BIOS file. If it hangs or gives you an error, try another file.

How to extract the actual BIOS from a Dell .EXE file

Execute the following command from a DOS command prompt window:

DellBiosFilename.exe /writeromfile

This should extract the actual BIOS file to the same directory.

I'm not sure how to update my BIOS with the modified file I just created

The method for updating your BIOS is different for each motherboard manufacturer.

  • With some, you can simply put the BIOS file on a USB key, reboot and enter the BIOS, and update it from there.
  • Others may have a BIOS updating program that you can run from within Windows.
  • And in some cases, you may need to put the BIOS on a bootable DOS USB key, CD, or DVD and update it from a command prompt.

If there's a Windows or DOS BIOS updating program, it will usually be included with the BIOS or mentioned when you download the BIOS. If you don't see it, check the downloads section, FAQ section, or support section.

If all else fails, try searching Google for your motherboard’s model and update BIOS or something like that.

150 Responses

  • MohammadReza ahangarian abhari June 4, 20164:06 pm

    hello.i have xeon E5450 cpu.iseted up this cpu on 775.i dont underestand these 3 ( You can make it readonly with the following command:

    attrib +R ncpucode.bin and
    Step 4
    cbrom195.exe YOUR_BIOS.BIN /nc_cpucode NCPUCODE.BIN

    YOUR_BIOS.BIN is the name of your BIOS file (it doesn’t have to end in .BIN)
    NCPUCODE.BIN is the name of the microcode file downloaded earlier)
    wherw can i get the name of my bios??wherw can i get the name of my microcode??
    could you please expain more about these 3 pharases????
    thanks for your helping me

    Reply
    • 1_2_3_Forward July 17, 20165:09 pm

      Its now July 17 2016. Greetings.
      AMI bios names usually end with the .bin extension. (for binary file)
      Award bios names usually end with the .exe extension. (for executable file)
      Depending on the manufacturer of your bios chip, the name they assign to the bios programming file may end in one of those file extension names.

      View your BIOS manufacturers name and its version in the BIOS screen when you first start your computer. You may also enter the bios setup program and search for info there. During the initial screen, there will be a message such as “hit delete to enter setup”. When you leave the program, just “exit without saving”.

      You don’t need the name of your microcode. Just navigate to your motherboard manufacturers web site support page for your board. Download the latest BIOS file. That will have cpu microcode inside it. Use the bios file you download and follow the instructions given on this web site.

      Next: You may already know that Disc Operated System, ie DOS, was one of the first operating systems for computers. Some programs are still written for DOS. Sometimes it’s better to run a program, such as a utility, outside of windows, not in windows. So you have to type the DOS commands at the prompt.
      Step 3 shows the DOS command to make the file called “ncpucode.bin” read-only, so it will not be overwritten by mistake. This protects the file.

      Step4 shows the DOS command that tells the executable program “cbrom195.exe” to add the cpu code written in the file”NCPUCODE.BIN” to your bios file (that you want to update) called “YOUR_BIOS.BIN”, a name they have used here as an example. You could decide to name your Bios file “mohrezab.bin or .exe depending on the manufacturer, as long as you write it down so you won’t forget what you called it.

      Take your time and keep trying.

      Reply
    • stevethegil July 28, 201610:04 pm

      Working on a GA-EP45T-UD3LR board trying to get upgraded to Win 7 to Win 10 before deadline in about 12 hours. Did the 771 mod some time ago and has been working fine with bios update. Now get message can not do upgrade due to CPU not supporting “CompareExchange128”. So time to update bios microcode.

      All seemed to be travelling fine until merge my bios file 45tud3lr.12e with microcode file a combination of three files performed earlier. In command window I get as far as Adding CPUCODE.BIN .. 85.6% and that is were it ends. It seems to create a file named bios.rom but I am not willing to flash that file as it may well be incomplete. I do not even know whether it is the correct file type.

      Any advice, even if I miss the deadline for free upgrade to Win 10 I will be wanting to do asap it will just cost me $.

      Reply
  • Daniel June 11, 20161:14 am

    Hey someone uses the old ones :D

    The name of your bios is exactly the filename of the bios file from the website – for me it was as example

    ep45ud3p.11d

    The NCPUCODE.BIN is the file you downloaded in step 1 – you can name it as you want and you have to use this name. Rename it to “NCPUCODE.BIN” for example :)

    It’s easy ;)

    Reply
  • Dimi July 17, 20165:10 am

    Verry nice Instruction.
    I added microcode for my X5460 in my Abit IP35P Motherboard. After that the temperature showed correct values (around 50C instead constant 98C on the old Bios).
    The Problem is that i can not boot in my windows anymore.
    Win 7 has a bluescreen (verry fast, can not see the message)
    Win 10 bluescreen with Errormessage (unsuported CPU).

    I tried method 1.
    Method 2 did not work.

    Please help.

    Reply
  • 1_2_3_Forward July 17, 20164:26 pm

    Award BIOS Gigabyte GA-EP45T-UD3LR rev1.1
    Upon adding the new cpu microcode to the bios file, before flashing , I ran “intelmicrocodelist.exe”, as instructed, to verify the code was added.
    I also ran that executable to check the microcode versions on several of the other bios files I have for this motherboard. According to “intelmicrocodelist.exe”, all of the bios files, even the ones I did not update with microcode, have the same Microcode List ver0.4a ?? Have a look…..

    D:\>cd gigabyte ep45t_ud3lr drivers

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS>intelmicrocodelist.exe motherboard_bios_ga-ep45
    t-ud3lr_f12e.exe
    Intel Microcode List ver0.4a

    Press any key to exit

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS>intelmicrocodelist.exe motherboard_bios_ga-ep45
    t-ud3lr_f12e(1).exe
    Intel Microcode List ver0.4a

    Press any key to exit

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS>intelmicrocodelist.exe motherboard_bios_ga-ep45
    t-ud3lr_f10.exe
    Intel Microcode List ver0.4a

    Press any key to exit

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS>intelmicrocodelist.exe motherboard_bios_ga-ep45
    t-ud3lr_f7.exe
    Intel Microcode List ver0.4a

    Press any key to exit

    SO why the same microcode list ver for several different bios releases, when only the first one was updated??

    Does this mean I do not have to flash the bios for the Xeon to be identified at bootup?

    I invite the site administrator’s advise.

    For general interest, I include the command prompt output of “cbrom195.exe” as it updates the code in my bios file as follows:
    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS\microcode update for 771 mod>cbrom195.exe biosf
    12e.exe/nc_cpucode ncpucode.bin
    cbrom195.exe V1.95 [12/14/07] (C)Phoenix Technologies 2001-2007
    Syntax:
    cbrom195.exe InputFile [/other] [8000:0] [RomFile|Release|Extract]
    cbrom195.exe InputFile [/D|logo|vga….] [RomFile|Release|Extract][checksum
    ]
    InputFile : System BIOS to be added with Option ROMs
    /D : For display all combined ROMs informations in BIOS
    /epa|epa1-7 : Add EPA LOGO BitMap to System BIOS
    /logo|logo1-7: Add OEM LOGO BitMap to System BIOS
    /osb_logo|osb_logo1-7: Add OSB LOGO BitMap to System BIOS
    /osb_bmp|osb_bmp1-7: Add OSB CPU BitMap to System BIOS
    /oem0-7 : Add special OEM ROM to System BIOS
    /err : Return error code after executed
    /btvga : Add VGA ROM to Boot Rom Block Area.
    /isa : Add ISA BIOS ROM to System BIOS.(/isa Filename [xxxx:0])
    /vga, /logo, /pci, /awdflash, /cpucode, /epa, /acpitbl, /vsa, /hpm
    /hpc, /fnt0 – 5, /ros, /nnoprom, /mib, /group0-5, /NoCompress
    /jpeg|jpeg1-3: Add JPEG LOGO to System BIOS
    /gif0-3 : Add GIF LOGO to System BIOS
    /rpb : Add RPB ROM to System BIOS
    /ver : Add version table of source code to System BIOS
    /jpeg_eng : Add JPEG engine to System BIOS
    /nc_cpucode : Add non-compress cpu code
    – Page – [Press any key….]
    /srom0-4 : Add software ROM
    /setup0-1 : Add setup ROM
    /biosf0-9 : Add BIOS feature ROM
    /GV3 : Add GV3 ROM
    /CALS : Calculate ROM Compress size but not add ROM in BIN file
    /efi0-9 : Add EFI feature ROM
    /minit : Add Intel memory module
    /NVMM : Add nVIDIA memory module
    /mpdrv : Add TPM MP driver
    /madrv : Add TPM MA driver
    /tcgsmi : Add TCG 32 bit smi code
    /flshcode : Add flash part code
    /SLPKey : Add SLP 2.0 Public Key
    /SLPMarker : Add SLP 2.0 Marker
    /NVPMU : Add PMU ROM
    /BTMEM : Add memsizing module in bootblock
    /HOLE0-7 : Add option ROM in hole
    /htinit : Add AMD HT init module
    – Page – [Press any key….]
    /1pe32 : Add type 1 PE32 module in mainblock
    /1pe32b : Add type 1 PE32 module in bootblock
    /2pe32 : Add type 2 PE32 module in mainblock
    /2pe32b : Add type 2 PE32 module in bootblock
    /3pe32 : Add type 3 PE32 module in mainblock
    /3pe32b : Add type 3 PE32 module in bootblock
    /4pe32 : Add type 4 PE32 module in mainblock
    /4pe32b : Add type 4 PE32 module in bootblock
    /ACPIModule : Add ACPI module, such as SSDT module.
    /SMI32 : Add 32-bit SMI module.
    /SMIAP : Add application SMI module.
    RomFile : File name of option ROM to add-in
    noreserve : No reserve system color for BMP logo
    Release : Release option ROM in current system BIOS
    Extract : Extract option ROM to File in current system BIOS
    checksum : Add checksum for Hole0~7 module at end of the hole.
    – Page – [Press any key….]
    /BOI UseDHCP Server_IP Static_IP Net_Mask Gate_Way DNS UseProxy
    Proxy_IP ProxyPort: Setting Boot On Internet parameters.
    /BOI : Show the Boot On Internet parameters.
    Example 1 for setting the BOI parameters:
    cbrom /boi 1 134.122.168.184 134.122.106.113 255.255.255.0
    134.122.106.5 134.122.101.90 0 134.122.106.105 32896
    Example 2 for setting the BOI parameters:
    cbrom /boi 1, 134.122.168.184, , , , 134.122.101.90 0, ,32896
    Example 3 for show the BOI parameters:
    cbrom /boi
    /TopHole:address : Add a module at fixed address.
    Example: cbrom /TopHole:FFFD0000 xxx.bin
    /osb_logo_gui|osb_logo1-7_gui: Add GUI OSB LOGO BitMap to System BIOS
    /osb_bmp_gui|osb_bmp1-7_gui: Add GUI OSB CPU BitMap to System BIOS
    <<>>
    cbrom195.exe 6a69s000.bin /D
    cbrom195.exe 6a69s000.bin /VGA filename
    cbrom195.exe 6a69s000.bin /VGA filename /ERR
    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS\microcode update for 771 mod>dir
    Volume in drive D is other room
    Volume Serial Number is 6CB9-1551

    Directory of D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS\microcode update for 771 mod

    07/14/2016 02:17 PM .
    07/14/2016 02:17 PM ..
    07/13/2016 11:37 PM 698,746 biosf12e.exe
    07/13/2016 07:56 PM 204,800 CBROM195.EXE
    01/07/2014 06:10 PM 114,176 intelmicrocodelist.exe
    07/13/2016 07:56 PM 41,305 intelmicrocodelist_v04a.zip
    07/13/2016 07:55 PM 77,824 ncpucode.bin
    07/14/2016 02:18 PM 5,325 update results from command prompt_copied
    here.rtf
    6 File(s) 1,142,176 bytes
    2 Dir(s) 109,531,590,144 bytes free

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS\microcode update for 771 mod>intelmicrocodelist
    .exe biosf12e.exe
    Intel Microcode List ver0.4a

    Press any key to exit

    D:\GIGABYTE EP45T_UD3LR DRIVERS\microcode update for 771 mod>

    Reply
  • Sparticle July 19, 20167:19 pm

    Can anyone provide a modded bios for a Xeon L5430 please. The motherboard is an ASUS Striker II Extreme that is on the tested motherboard list. The latest BIOS is 1402 http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/socket775/Striker_II_Extreme/1402.zip?_ga=1.2750006.789708313.1468969060

    The L5430 is a 1067a processor.

    Any help appreciated. I am keen to see if we can get this board working with an L5430 Xeon.

    Cheers
    Spart

    Reply
  • Fegkari July 26, 20162:43 pm

    So I just used method 2 to add the microcodes for my Xeon X5460 to the latest BIOS version for my ASUS P5N-D and it seemed to go without incident, at least until I boot it back up from total BIOS reset. My CMOS battery is dead, so I just unplugged the tower long enough for the remaining power to drain from the board (getting in and out of my case is kind of a pain in the balls). After reboot I continue to receive the message that an unknown processor is installed and I should update my BIOS. I’d rather not use method 1 if I don’t have to; is it just an issue with my BIOS or did I fuck it up?

    Reply
  • stevethegil July 28, 201610:08 pm

    Excuse my if I put this is as a reply earlier.

    Working on a GA-EP45T-UD3LR board trying to get upgraded to Win 7 to Win 10 before deadline in about 12 hours. Did the 771 mod some time ago and has been working fine with bios update. Now get message can not do upgrade due to CPU not supporting “CompareExchange128”. So time to update bios microcode.

    All seemed to be travelling fine until merge my bios file 45tud3lr.12e with microcode file a combination of three files performed earlier. In command window I get as far as Adding CPUCODE.BIN .. 85.6% and that is were it ends. It seems to create a file named bios.rom but I am not willing to flash that file as it may well be incomplete. I do not even know whether it is the correct file type.

    Any advice, even if I miss the deadline for free upgrade to Win 10 I will be wanting to do asap it will just cost me $.

    Reply
  • drspychology July 29, 201611:34 am

    Hi, I am having some trouble adding the microcodes. I have a Supermicro C2SBA motherboard and have an x5450 installed. It’s getting recognized in the bios and I can boot into windows, however it is getting extremely high temperatures and when running cinebench, it’s scoring lower than my Q6600. My first guess is that this is due to the bios, however, when coming to step 4 of this guide, cbrom freezes. I grabbed the latest bios ROM from the supermicro website, however the cbrom command doesn’t do anything when I’m checking if I have the right file. I can’t find another file that could be the bios. Can someone help me?

    Reply
  • anon August 22, 201611:45 pm

    I’ve been trying to patch my bios with cbrom195.exe but it says “file not found” a lot. I must be doing something wrong and I’ll need to come back to this later.

    G41MT-S2PT rev 2.1, X5470. Other than that everything runs fine, I’m just trying to get my missing functions back.

    BIOS: 41mts2p3.f2
    http://download.gigabyte.us/FileList/BIOS/mb_bios_ga-g41mt-s2pt_v2.x_f2.exe

    Reply
    • anon August 24, 20166:13 am

      Solved my problem by moving my bios file and cbrom195.exe to my environment variable path instead of a different folder like I was trying before. It helps to follow all the instructions to a T.

      Got all my instructions back and we’re ready to go now.

      Reply
  • Olivier August 23, 20166:13 am

    Hello,

    This procedure works also for motherboard with socket P478 or we need other microcode? If yes, where can we find microcodes for this type of socket?

    Olivier

    Reply

Leave a Comment